Central European Journal of Sport Sciences and Medicine

ISSN: 2300-9705     eISSN: 2353-2807     DOI: 10.18276/cej.2017.2-01
CC BY-SA   Open Access   DOAJ  DOAJ

Lista wydań / Vol. 18, No. 2/2017
The Importance of Directly Derived Information in the Basketball Jump Shot. A Comparison of Changed Visual Conditions from Different Shooting Spots

Autorzy: Alexander Pohl
University of Hildesheim, Institute of Sport Science, Germany

Markus Böker
University of Hildesheim, Institute of Sport Science, Germany

Linda Hennig
University of Hildesheim, Institute of Sport Science, Germany

Thomas Heinen
University of Hildesheim, Institute of Sport Science, Germany
Słowa kluczowe: basketball especial skills generalized motor program jump shot visual perception
Rok wydania:2017
Liczba stron:8 (5-12)
Cited-by (Crossref) ?:

Abstrakt

The basketball jump shot as a movement, allowing visual feedback based corrections, can be considered as a generalized or a specialized motor skill. The purpose of this study is to look into the connection between visual perception and the specialization of a motor skill. Therefore, six male basketball players were asked to perform jump shots under different viewing conditions from their favourite spot (sweet spot) and a second, middle-distance spot. The question was, if performance is affected by the changed visual conditions and whether the shooting spot plays a role in a potentially change in performance. The different visual conditions were first, a regular basketball hoop with no adjustment, second a regular basketball hoop with a covered backboard, and third a regular basketball hoop with a covered rim. Between the different visual conditions, performance did not differ significantly, neither from the sweet spot, nor from the neutral defined spot. However, players showed a significantly better performance from sweet spot than from the neutral spot under regular viewing conditions.
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